Concrete shell transformed into a school

Photo by Worldwide Christian Schools

(Photo by Worldwide Christian Schools)

Uganda (WWCS/MNN) — In a world where everything must be instantaneous for it to be right, it’s amazing to see the blessings and faith that come from a slow process.

Chad Neeley of Worldwide Christian School shares an update from a school building project:

What was once a concrete skeleton is growing into a full-fledged school: Edusabo Junior School in Kasawo, Uganda!

When we first visited this school, it consisted of concrete pillars in an empty space. There are now four classrooms and offices for staff. Starting this week, they will begin the roofing process to make these rooms usable for teaching. This means they will no longer need to cram six to eight classes into their church. It means classes will not have to stop because of rain. It means that the school will not only have a reputation for great academics, but also one of growth, by the grace of God! 

When we were there visiting just over a week ago, they were bragging about their kids–and rightly so. They have 415 students! Believe it or not, some of those students are Muslim as well, but that is a good thing. In order for Muslim students to be enrolled, the parents have to acknowledge that the teaching is not modified for Islam. They, too, are taught about Jesus and His love for them! 

I am proud to be a part of the construction of this school. I am happy to have met the wonderful people who strive daily to keep it running. But mostly, I am proud to be a part of a project that is sustainably ministering to the people of this village every day.

The Kasawo School Project

CHAD’S ROLE AT KASAWO

My role at the Kasawo project is unique. I do not work directly with the construction teams. This project had seen great progress before I ever showed up. And if you knew Uganda well, that is momentum that could not be lost. When a mzungu [foreigner] shows up, prices increase, salaries are raised, and time is a luxury.

Instead of the traditional construction management that I would usually partake in, I consult. I work with the leadership of the school and church and organize material purchase, estimating, scheduling, and progress planning. My expertise is being used vicariously through the administrators.

Edusabo Junior School (Photo courtesy of WWCS)

Edusabo Junior School (Photo courtesy of WWCS)

I have assigned one of my trained builders to work at the project, a Ugandan. He ensures that the construction materials are made properly so that money is not wasted by making a poorly constructed building. The labor is supplied through the congregation of the church.

All in all, though this project is not being built with great speed, it is building the Kingdom! Soon, these 415 students will learn in actual classrooms!

Praise God for His faithfulness. Pray that the school would have a positive impact on the community.

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